Abnormal Results – YA Fiction

Abnormal front

It’s been me, Chad, Alecia and Dan since kindergarten, back when it didn’t matter about boys or girls or who had name brand shoes or who could play sports or not. Things have changed over the years. We’ve changed. But I was sure nothing was big enough to wedge into our friendship. We’d stay the same forever.
I was wrong.

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It’s not often a story picks you up and carries you with it. I started working on this book and found myself sucked in. The first draft was finished in exactly 4 weeks, which I think is a record.
I hope readers enjoy it as much as I have!

Enjoy a sneak peek below.

Available Now in Paperback and E-book.

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ABNORMAL RESULTS

cancer changes everything

Random Fact: Your stomach has to produce a new layer of mucus every 2 weeks or it will digest itself.

You should know that I collect random facts and keep them in a green notebook that must always be placed third from the left on my bookshelf, next to my red notebook on clichés and my blue notebook on metaphors.

I am aware this is abnormal.

CHAPTER one

You know that cheesy phrase about having your ducks in a row? My mom is always saying it when we’re running out the door, usually late, on our way somewhere.

My dad says it, too. “Do we have all our ducks?” he’ll ask mom, which is funny since there are only two of us kids, and I’m fifteen. I don’t often get lost on the way from my bedroom to the front door, though the two times I did have made for a great family joke ever since. That was sarcasm in case you missed it.

Alex, my little brother, wanted in on the fun, but he never could figure out where the ducks were. Mom took him to a park once and showed him a family of ducks swimming in a row across a pond, and tried to explain what a metaphor was, but he being only five at the time understood it about as well as I’m understanding why an x plus a y divided by a z somehow turns into a number.

The whole duck thing is important, because when all your ducks are in a row, it means your life is in order. Things are under control. I had no idea how rare a gift that was, all those little ducks staying right where they should be, until cancer knocked one of mine over.

Not a duck though. A dork. One of us four.

I suppose I should explain the whole dork thing. When we were really little, my three best friends and I were waiting in line at Swirly Cone, one of those side-of-the-road ice cream shops. Baby brother Alex, whose full name is Alexander but he hates it, was hanging out with Mom, telling her about his latest genius creation with sidewalk chalk. I saw his eyes suddenly get real big and he tugged on Mom’s arm. “Mom, look!” People all down the line turned to see him point at us and yell, “It’s four dorks in a row!”

We’ve been the four dorks ever since: me, Chad, Alecia and Dan. We were thick as thieves, as Dad used to say (he and Mom like to see who can use the most clichés and metaphors), since kindergarten, back when it didn’t matter about boys or girls or who had cool name brand shoes or who could play sports or not. Things have changed over the years. We’ve changed. But I was sure nothing was big enough to wedge into our friendship. We’d stay the same forever.

I was wrong.

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